You must have heard about Lugang(鹿港) if you come to Taiwan. Lugang can be seen as one of the must-go in Taiwan. Talking about Lugang, it was once the economic and transport hub of central Taiwan in earlier times. There is a saying goes "The first is Tainan, second is Lugang and the third is Mengjia(today's Wanhua district in Taipei)". This illustrates the high position of the town in its glory days. In addition to being the early cultural capital of Taiwan, Lugang was also a commercially prosperous area. During the Qing dynasty, the town was an important trading port, bringing all…

Chinese Valentine's Day is a traditional holiday which means a lot in Chinese tradition. Falls on the seventh day of the seventh month of the lunar calendar, it is also known as "The Begging Festival" in Chinese tradition. It's the story that the seventh daughter of the Emperor of Heaven, the Weaving Maid, and an orphaned cowherd were separated by the Emperor; the girl was forced to move to the star Vega and the cowherd, to the star Altair. They were only allowed to meet on the magpie bridge over the Milky Way once a year on the day of…

A temple with a Taoist hall in the front and a Buddhist hall (青雲寺) in the back, both richly decorated with folk art. In fact it has the largest collection of works by master painter Pan Lishui (潘麗水) of any temple in Taiwan. This includes a massive landscape mural that was recently restored. The square in front of the temple is full of old shops and night vendors selling traditional eats like flying-fish balls and Shantou noodles. Travel Info Daitian Temple [高雄代天宮 / Gao Hsiungˊ Daiˋ Tian Gong] -Located in:South Taiwan -County:Kaohsiung -Features:Scenic Spots, Outdoor activities -Highly recommend to:Outdoors Enthusiasts,…

Chinese New year has already half passed. As we all know that Taiwan is famous for traditional temples. Have you ever been to one of the top 5 temples in Taiwan? If not, don't worry! You still have this weekend to make a visit for these temples. Here comes the introduction. Taipei Longshan Temple [台北龍山寺 / Taiˊ Beiˇ Longˊ Shan Shiˋ]

Longshan Temple is one of five Longshans in Taipei, and as such is devoted to the Guanyin Buddha. Built in 1738 and then rebuilt in the 1850s, the temple retains much of its southern architectural roots. The swallowtail roof is particularly elegant. You can find the temple hidden away in the lanes of the traditional market. Travel Info Longshan Temple [龍山寺 /lóng shān sì]  -Located in:Taipei, Northern Taiwan -County:New Taipei City -Features:Temple arts, Taiwanese religion culture -Highly recommend to:Chinese culture/architecture enthusiasts  -Contact:+886-2-2621-4866 -Transportation:Bus-->Yongle Ln. Entrance(Zhongshan Market) -Address:No. 22號, Lane 95, Zhongshan Road, Tamsui District, New Taipei City Editor : [email protected] Thanks…

Recipient of a Unesco Asia-Pacific Heritage Award for both its restoration and its revival of temple rites and festivities, the Bao'an Temple is a must-visit when in Taipei. This exquisite structure is loaded with prime examples of the traditional decorative arts, and the yearly folk arts festival is a showcase of traditional performance arts. The temple was founded in 1760 by immigrants from Quanzhou, Fujian province, and its modern size and design began to take shape in 1805. The main resident god is Baosheng Dadi (Saint Wu), a historical figure revered for his medical skills. The rear shrine is dedicated to…

This Earth God (Tudigong) temple is an interesting blend of Japanese, Chinese and Western elements. The outside features two old stone lamps, while the interior sports a beautiful post-and-beam structure (made without nails), intricately carved stone pillars, and panels, including one over the main altar with nude Western-style angels. To reach the temple, walk up the main road to the top of the hill where the road splits. Left will take you to Jinguashi and right will take you to Fushan Temple in about 1km. The Earth God has one of the lowest rankings in the Chinese pantheon, but, not…

When in Taipei, you have to visit at least one of the temples. You’ll witness some of the most detailed, finely crafted buildings you’ll ever see in your life, gold, red, wooden designs interwoven with candles, incense and soft colours. If I had to have a temple built, I’d have it modeled after the temples in Taipei. Unlike some other countries where prayer seems to largely be a thing of the past. The Taiwanese, both young and old take time out of their daily lives for prayer and worship. I’m far from a religious fanatic, but I find Taiwan’s devotion…

This lively and well-loved temple on Dihua St was built in 1856 to house the City God statue that the losers in the Wanhua feud took as they fled upstream. Little changed since those days, the temple is a terrific spot to witness folk worship rituals as well as admire some gorgeous pieces of traditional arts and crafts. The temple management deserves kudos for the clear English signs about the temple introducing the City God, the City God's Wife and the Matchmaker (said to have brought together thousands of couples), as well as some of the temple's outstanding decorative pieces. Two of…

Founded in 1738 by Han immigrants from Fujian, this temple has served as a municipal, guild and self-defense centre, as well as a house of worship. These days it is one of the city's top religious sites, and a prime venue for exploring both Taiwan's vibrant folk faith and its unique temple arts and architecture. Longshan is dedicated to the Bodhisattva of mercy, Guanyin, though in true Taiwanese style there are over 100 other gods and goddesses worshiped in the rear and side halls. Matsu, goddess of the sea, is enshrined in the back centre; Wenchang Dijun, the god of…